USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux Usage Scenarios

USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux permits to work with any USB device in those cases when one would think it is impossible to do so – when, for example, USB device cannot be moved due to some reasons from one computer to another, or there are no USB ports in your computer at all.
USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux technology allows sharing any USB device on one computer (server). Now any computer (client) can use USB device shared on server over network as if it were plugged directly to the client computer.
So now your USB devices can be accessed from anywhere, for example, by all workers in your office, or even from other offices or even from another city. There is no need now to additionally purchase the same USB device for everyone who needs to use it.
Moreover, both server and client are combined into a single application, which is easy to install and use without special knowledge required.
Let’s review situations when USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux can be used:
  1. Access MFD from any room of your office

    The most common example is sharing a multifunction device (all-in-one device – copier, printer and scanner) among workers of your office. It takes time and effort to move this massive device from one office room to another. It is also a bad idea to come to the computer this USB device is attached to and use it, thus preventing your colleague from working. Here is the solution:

    • Install USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux on computer in your room (server) and on computers of all workers (clients) who are going to utilize the device.
    • Connect USB device to server and share it there using USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux.
    • Now anyone (clients) can connect to this shared device remotely and use it as if it were connected directly to their computers. The shared USB device appears in Device Manager and all programs treat it as a local USB device. Moreover, your workers can see what client the shared device is currently occupied by, which is very convenient when say someone has forgotten to disconnect from it. Additionally, you can set a password to control remote access to the device.
  2. Access USB devices in a virtual machine session

    When a virtual machine is running, its window becomes an active one, so you are unable to access USB devices plugged into the host computer (real machine) anymore. Though you can redirect USB devices from the host computer to the guest one (virtual machine), it is not a good idea anyway as the number of the virtual machine’s USB ports is limited and all of them may be already occupied.

    But it’s not a problem anymore with USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux! While working on a virtual machine you can access USB devices that are plugged into a real machine – your local host computer or even any other computers available over network. How can it be achieved? It’s very easy:

    • Install USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux on both real and virtual machines.
    • Share USB device on a real machine (server) – either local machine, or any other computer that can be accessed over network.
    • Establish connection with remote shared USB device from virtual machine (client).
    • The shared USB device will appear in Device Manager on your virtual machine. So now you can access this USB device and use it as if it were plugged directly into virtual machine you are working on now.
  3. Access USB devices while working in remote desktop session

    As soon as you connect to a remote desktop, all USB devices plugged into your local machine become unavailable for usage. The solution is simple:

    • USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux should be installed on both machines: the local one (server), to which your USB device is physically connected, and the remote machine (client), to which you connect via RDP client.
    • Share USB device on the local machine, then connect to this device from the remote desktop. That’s it! Moreover, using USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux, you can connect to any shared USB device, available over network, not necessarily on your local machine.

    This scenario is also ideal for thin clients. Using USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux, you can share USB devices, plugged into local machine (thin client) and then access them from the remote desktop.

  4. Access USB devices from blade servers
    Using USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux, you can access USB devices while working remotely on the blade server:

    Share USB device on any computer in the network (server) using USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux, and then connect to this shared device from the blade server (client). USB Network Gate for Windows/Linux should be installed on both machines. Now you can freely use this USB device on the blade server as if it were connected directly to it.